#943 (11/19/22)

MODERN RECORDS - PART SIX (1951-1956)

THIS ARTICLE IS IN MEMORY OF DAVID SAVIET WHO LEFT US ON OCTOBER 22, 2022.

DAVE CONTRIBUTED TO THIS WEBSITE FOR OVER SIXTEEN YEARS. HE MASTERFULLY RESTORED ALL THE 78-RPM RECORDS'S AUDIO, MAKING THEM SOUND GREAT!



Above: CASH BOX COVER, April 24, 1954.
CAPTION: B.B. King, who has had outstanding success as one of the most consistent sellers in the Rhythm and Blues field, smiles broadly as he is presented with an award from Hunter Hancock (right), Los Angeles disk jockey, commemorating the artist's last seven records on RPM, all of which have attained top popularity. Looking on is Joe Bihari, head of the diskery. King's latest is "Love You Baby" backed with "The Woman I Love".

PART SIX features Modern Records's subsidiary label, RPM RECORDS.

Artists include B.B. King, The Nic Nacs (Mickey Champion And The Robins), Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns, Donna Hightower (And Vocal Group), Joe Houston, Roscoe Gordon, Lightning Hopkins, Luke Jones, and The Robins on Crown.

Highlighted are the songs "Don't You Think I Ought To Know" and "Shtiggy Boom".

Modern's subsidiary label, FLAIR RECORDS, will be covered in Part Seven of this article.

RPM RECORDS:

Some of the other artists with records released on the RPM label are Memphis Eddie, Gene Phillips, Jimmy McCracklin, Jimmy Nelson, Maxwell Davis, Howlin' Wolf, Saunders King, King Perry, Zola Taylor, The Meadowlarks, Junior Parker, Earl Curry, Johnny "Guitar" Watson....

Roy Hawkins, The Trojans, Prentice Moreland, Darrell Glenn And The Commodores, Curtis Irvin And The Sparks, Buddy Milton And The Twilighters, Little George Smith, The Chanters, and The Teen Queens. The Jacks on RPM were covered in Part Five of this article.

THE BILLBOARD, June 24, 1950:
....Joe Bihari, another of the Bihari brothers of Modern Records, was in Chicago last week setting up distribs for his RPM diskery. His brother Jules started the Question Mark label....

(NOTE: Some other blurbs state that "Question Mark" was Lester Bihari's new label. In any case, it was a temporary label name until the actual name could be decided. The only label where Lester held sole ownership was Meteor Records, started in late 1952.)

TRADE PUBLICATION, July 1950:
....Modern Records will launch a new a new subsid label, RPM Records, which will be devoted mainly to r.&b. products. Label will also deal with folk talent. At the same time, Modern topper Jules Bihari said that his firm was going to give up the pop field by scrapping the Colonial label....

(NOTE: The Colonial label was included in Part Two of this article.)

TRADE PUBLICATION, October 1950: MODERN'S RPM SUBSID BOWS
HOLLYWOOD—Modern Records is bowing its subsid label, RPM Records, thru a new web of 25 distribs, thereby allowing the firm to have two outlets in a single territory.

Coast plattery found many of its distribs unwilling to absorb too many releases of the Modern line. Hence to avoid existing distribs carrying heavy inventory, it is funneling its subsid label to the new distribs.

RPM's talent roster will differ from artists on the Modern label, but label's policy will adhere to the rhythm-blues line held by Modern.

THE BILLBOARD, October 18, 1952: BIHARIS FOLD R&B, HYPE MODERN, RPM HOLLYWOOD—The Bihari brothers have folded the tent on their short-lived Rhythm And Blues [sic] label and are seeking new talent to concentrate on their other two labels, Modern and RPM. Joe Bihari left this week for a two-month swing cross-country to visit distributors and scout new talent.

He will huddle in Clarksville, Miss., with Ike Turner, who has joined the firm as talent rep in the South. Gene Forrest, formerly with Recorded In Hollywood, and Cliff Bivins, Los Angeles vocalist, have been added in the drive.

The Biharis have joined the trend on the part of local indies to press from one central plant here and air ship all disks to distributors.

(NOTE: The correct label name is "Blues & Rhythm". There were seven releases, all in 1952.
Per Marv Goldberg, it was supposed to handle "Country Blues", as opposed to the quickly-fading citified Blues.
)

Above Left: TRADE PUBLICATION, July 1951.

Above Middle: CASH BOX, June 28, 1952.

Above Right: CASH BOX, September 13, 1952.


B.B. KING:

B.B. KING was a singer, guitarist, songwriter, and orchestra leader. Originally from Mississippi, he moved to Memphis, TN, in 1946. It was there that he became known for his WDIA radio show. He joined Modern Records, recording for their RPM label, in 1950. From then to 1957, B.B. King had 37 records released on RPM.

Above: Photos of B.B. King (WDIA, Memphis, circa 1948).
Above: Label images for both sides of RPM Records 330, released in 1951. As seen in previous parts of this article, Jules/Joe Bihari regularly took co-composer credit on many of the Modern and RPM records under the name "Taub".

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Hard Workin' Woman" - B.B. King (Vocal Backing By The Band) - RPM 330 - 1951.
2. "She's A Mean Woman" - B.B. King - RPM 330 - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above: Photo of B.B. King, RPM Records artist.
Above: Label images for both sides of RPM Records 395, released in 1953.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Blind Love" - B.B. King And His Orchestra - RPM 395 - 1953.
2. "Why Did You Leave Me" - B.B. King And His Orchestra - RPM 395 - 1953.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

The Billboard Review (11-21-53):

B. B. KING ORK — RPM 395
Blind Love (83)
Here's a wild and very exciting effort by King, with substantial help from the pulsating guitar backing. His vocal is powerful and the lyric tells a real sad story about the girl be loves. Watch this one, it could be another hit for the Southern blues singer.
Why Did You Leave Me (73) A pretty, listenable, slow and easy blues is sung with feeling by the singer over insinuating combo support. Flip side is more powerful, but this side should pull many spins.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good" and 80-89 as "excellent".)

THE BILLBOARD, November 14, 1953: NEW RECORDS TO WATCH
Blind Love/Why Did You Leave Me - Two good blues efforts by King who has been red-hot. "Love" is particularly appealing. It's a real wild side with standout instrumentation behind the singer.

CASH BOX, May 28, 1955:
........The Bihari's have seven new releases that are kicking up a storm throughout the country. They include B. B. King's "Shut Your Mouth" b/w "I'm In Love" (RPM); Marvin & Johnny's "Sugar Mama" b/w "Butter Ball" (Modern); Arthur Lee Maye's "Loop De Loop De Loop" b/w "Love Me Always" (RPM); The Jacks' "Smack Dab In The Middle" b/w "Why Don't You Write Me" (RPM); The Cadets' "Rolling Stone" b/w "Fine Looking Baby" (Modern); Richard Berry's "God Gave Me You" b/w "Don't You Go" (Flair), and Elmore James' "Happy Home" b/w "No Love In My Life" (Flair)....

CASH BOX, July 9, 1955:
....The first instrumental featuring "Blues Boy" B. B. King was recently released on the RPM label. Titles are "Boogie Rock" b/w "Talkin' The Blues"....

CASH BOX, July 16, 1955:
....B. B. King's first instrumental, "Boogie Rock", on RPM is leaving everyone in a tizzy due to spontaneous sales reports....


B.B. King (Cash Box 5-28-55)

Cash Box Review 11-28-53
Above Left: CASH BOX, February 2, 1954.

Above Middle: THE BILLBOARD, April 24, 1954.
(Note the change to the new "RPM" font style.)

Above Right: CASH BOX, April 16, 1955.

Above: Label images for both sides of RPM Records 479, released in 1956. Composers credited for "Bim Bam" are Maxwell Davis and Joe Bihari. "On My Word Of Honor" was also done by The Platters in 1956.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Bim Bam" - B.B. King And His Orchestra (With Vocal Group) - RPM 479 - 1956.
2. "On My Word Of Honor" - B.B. King And His Orchestra (With Vocal Group) - RPM 479 - 1956.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


The Billboard Review (11-3-56):

B. B. KING ORK — RPM 479
On My Word Of Honor (82)
The great B. B. King sings a pop-flavored ballad here. Gets a big sound, and he's backed with chorus, which adds in the effect. But wouldn't the fans rather have his customary style?
Bim Bam (71) Up-tempo blues with a novelty lyric. B. B. will sell with it; but it doesn't match his great stuff.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good" and 80-89 as "excellent".)

Cash Box Review (11-3-56):

B. B. KING ORK — RPM 479
On My Word Of Honor ((B+)
Ace blues singer B. B. King offers a powerful side for the pop market in this dramatic love song which he belts with great force and meaning. King's most commercial side to date. Could break wide open.
Bim Bam (C+) King does a complete turnabout and flies thru a wild jumper that swings from the first groove right thru to the last.
(NOTE: A rating of C+ was considered "good" and B+ as "excellent".)

CASH BOX, July 9, 1955:
....The first instrumental featuring "Blues Boy" B. B. King was recently released on the RPM label. Titles are "Boogie Rock" b/w "Talkin' The Blues".... B. B. King has just signed a new three-year contract with RPM records, which marks his seventh straight year of recording for the Coast label. First release under the new contract will be an L.P. album which Joe Bahari recorded in Memphis....

CASH BOX, March 16, 1957: B.B. KING INTO POP FIELD
HOLLYWOOD—RPM Records last week released a new single record by B.B. King aimed strictly at the pop market. Choice of material and a full orchestral background with voices were planned to attract the pop record buyer. King, an established top seller in the blues field, broke into the pop charts with his last release of "On My Word Of Honor". Initial reaction from distributors indicates that the new disk could be another contender for pop honors.


B.B. KING

NEWSPAPERS—B.B. KING:
Above Left: CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, March 28, 1952.

Above Left Middle: MACON TELEGRAPH, March 28, 1953.

Above Right Middle: LEXINGTON LEADER, August 25, 1953.

Above Right: EVANSVILLE PRESS, December 14, 1956.

PITTSBURGH COURIER, September 8, 1956: B. B. KING NAMED KING OF THE BLUES
NEW York—In a poll of 500 record dealers throughout the nation, blues singer B. B. King was chosen as "King of the Blues".

The 30-year-old former Mississippi plantation worker was the winner of the survey conducted by Bobby Robinson, president of the Harlem Record Dealers Association. King will be awarded a scroll by the association upon his return to New York.

Raised in an atmosphere where blues was sung in its creative form, King first started plunking on his father's battered guitar and shouting lyrics when he was six years old. A Courier theatrical poll winner, King compiled the highest vote total in the contest.

(NOTE: Bobby Robinson was owner of a record shop in Harlem, as well as various record labels, including Red Robin.)

NEW YORK AGE, December 8, 1956: HEADS DISC SETUP NOW
MEMPHIS, Tenn.—B. B. King, one of the country's top blues singers announced that he had set up his own recording firm, Blues Boy Kingdom, in an effort to aid the young talent that is neglected by the major record firms.

Surrounded by $20,000 worth of recording equipment in the building at 164 Beale Street, that houses his new firm, he said:

"Unless someone takes time out to aid kids then the world may never hear a future Sammy Davis, Jr., Pearl Bailey, or Fats Domino. I hope that my firm can be used by them as a springboard to success."


THE NIC NACS (MICKEY CHAMPION AND THE ROBINS):

MICKEY CHAMPION was a singer. She recorded as a single artist for RPM (1950), Aladdin (1952), and with the Roy Milton Band on DooTone (1956). She continued to perform regularly with Roy Milton (whom she married) until at least 1958.

Above: Photo of Mickey Champion.
THE ROBINS were on the scene for a long time. They had releases on Excelsior (as The Four Bluebirds, 1949), Aladdin (1949), Aladdin's subsidiary Score (1949), Savoy (1949-50), Recorded In Hollywood (1950-51), RCA Victor (1953), Crown (1954), Spark (1954-55), Atco (1955), Whippet (1956-57), and Knight (1958). The Atco was a re-release of their last record on Spark.

They backed up Maggie Hathaway on Recorded In Hollywood (1950), Little Esther on Savoy (1950),and Mel Walker (as The Bluenotes) on Savoy's subsidiary Regent (1950).


[The above photo is courtesy of Jean-Christophe Piazza.]
Above: Circa 1954 photo of The Robins (L-R) Bobby Nunn (bass), Ty Terrell (tenor), Roy Richard (baritone), Billy Richard (tenor), and Grady Chapman (tenor). These are the group members on Crown 106 "I Made A Vow" (see further below).

The Nic Nacs consisted of Mickey Champion (lead singer), Bobby Nunn, Ty Terrell, Roy Richard, and Billy Richard.

Click HERE for an article about THE ROBINS by Marv Goldberg and Todd Baptista.
(Will open in a separate window)

Above Left: Photo of Mickey Champion.

Above Middle And Right: Label images for both sides of RPM Records 342, recorded on November 2, 1950 and released in December 1951.

This record was released for the Christmas market in 1950, 1951 and 1952 (as RPM 313, 342, and then 313 again). "Found Me A Sugar Daddy" was also released with a different flip side in February 1951 (as RPM 316).

BMI credits Jules Bihari as composer of "Found Me A Sugar Daddy" and Joe Bihari for "Gonna Have A Merry Christmas".

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Found Me A Sugar Daddy" - The Nic Nacs (With Mickey Champion) - RPM 342 - 1951.
2. "Gonna Have A Merry Christmas" - The Nic Nacs (With Mickey Champion) - RPM 342 - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

EXTRA: LISTEN TO RPM 316 FLIP-SIDE (Windows Media Player):
"You Didn't Want My Love" - The Nic Nacs - RPM 316 - 1951.

The Billboard Review (12-13-54):

THE NIC NACS — RPM 313
Found Me A Sugar Daddy (74)
Boy-girl blues is shouted strongly by the lead singers. Rhythm is slow but penetrating and side might catch some juke coin.
Gonna Have A Merry Christmas (67) Blues about a romantic holiday reunion has a sad, sad sound. Side isn't likely to do much.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 60-69 usually considered as "satisfactory" and 70-79 as "good".)

EXTRA RECORDS—THE ROBINS":
Above Left: Label image for Spark 103, released in 1954.

Above Right: Label image for Crown 106, released in 1954. Crown was a subsidiary label of Modern Records. Note the red label with silver print and silver ring is consistent with the Modern and RPM label designs, as well as their other subsidiary, Flair Records.

The Robins' group members on this record are as shown in their photo further up this page. The same line-up is on Crown 120, as by "The Robbins", also released in 1954.

It's probable that "The Drifters" on Crown 108 are actually The Robins, but may be a different line-up than on the other Crown sides. The Robins, as "The Robbins", also had one record on the Modern label in 1951. That grouping is the same as The Nic Nacs, but without Mickey Champion.

Note the "JB" in the matrix number, signifying "Jules Bihari".

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Riot In Cell Block #9" - The Robins - Spark 103 - 1954.
2. "I Made A Vow" - The Robins - Crown 106 - 1954.
3. "Double Crossin Baby" - The Robins - Crown 106 - 1954.

ALL THREE SONGS played in sequence.

Above Left: Photo of Richard Berry, who sings the lead part in The Robins' "Riot In Cell Block #9". Richard was under contract with Modern Records at the time. He soon after recorded a similar song, "The Big Break", with The Crowns, for Modern's subsidiary label, Flair. That song will be included in Part Seven of this article.

Above Right: CASH BOX, June 5, 1954.

The Billboard Review (2-7-54):

THE ROBINS — CROWN 106
I Made A Vow (76)
A fairly good rhythm and blues ballad gets first-rate performance from the vocal group. A pair of strong lead voices spark the reading.
Double Crossin Baby (70) Good vocal group delivers a simple riff item with plenty of drive and spirit. Could make noise with this.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

Cash Box Review (3-13-54):

THE ROBINS — CROWN 106
I Made A Vow (B)
The group blends prettily on a slow blues lilt. Plaintive lead handles his chores effectively.
Double Crossin Baby (B) The flip has the Robins beating out a quick beat jump infectiously. Lyrics say he's gonna find someone new who loves him more than she does. Exciting sound.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)

THE BILLBOARD, June 5, 1954: REVIEW SPOTLIGHT... THE ROBINS
Riot In Cell Block #9 - A new group, a new label, a song with a bright set of lyrics and a good performance by The Robins make this add up to a strong new release. This side is clever and catchy, and has possibilities.

(NOTE: The Billboard gave "Riot..." an "82" rating, considered as "excellent".)

CASH BOX, May 15, 1954:
....The Robins have a promising new lead tenor. His name is Carl Gardner. The group has just released a new disc on the Spark label that could be a smash follow-up to their Victor waxing of "Ten Days In Jail". The title is "Riot In Cell Block #9"....

Cash Box Review (6-12-54):

THE ROBINS — SPARK 103
Riot In Cell Block #9 (B+)
The Robins bounce out a crazy story of a riot in cell block #9. A slow jump item is adorned with siren and machine gun bursts and the result is an intriguing ditty. Things come out all right in the end. After 47 hours things quiet down and the boys are back in their cells. The Robins and a fluid horn give the wax a real blues flavor. Novelty could get strong sales and juke action.
(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered as "excellent".)

THE BILLBOARD, July 24, 1954: "RIOT" DISK DRAWS BAN BY COAST CBS
HOLLYWOOD—The recording of "Riot in Cell Block No. 9", by the Robins on Spark Records, has been banned here by CBS radio and television. Disk was slated to be aired by Peter Potter on his "Juke Box Jury" network radio show and by Larry Finley on his local KNXT television show, but was subsequently pulled when CBS clearances were not forthcoming.

Song is a rhythm and blues click for the group, who did a live guest shot on Al Jarvis' ABC-TV show here this week, and also aired same via Station KTTV on their "Rhythm & Blues" television show recently.


LUKE JONES:

LUKE JONES was a saxophone player, songwriter, and orchestra leader. Luke had one record each on Modern and RPM, both released in 1950.

CALIFORNIA EAGLE, April 29, 1948: NO BIZ IN SHOW BIZ SO JONES TURNS BARBER
Luke Jones, who made musical history in and around Los Angeles as one of the top saxophonists on the musical totem pole, has deserted the theatrical profession to open a first class tonsorial parlor in the Watts area.

Jones, who started his musical career back in the twenties with the late Leon Hereford band, has played just about every smart nite spot in the California nitery belt, and turned down offers with Lionel Hampton, Lucky Millinder, and Tiny Bradshaw because of the strenuous one-nighters. He prefers to remain on the Coast.

When asked by an EAGLE reporter whether or not he will remain out of the music profession permanently, Jones stated "Nope, I just want to open a barber shop". And that, as the saying goes, is that.

Above: Photo of Luke Jones from the early 1940s, when he was with Roy Milton And His Solid Senders.
Above: Label images for both sides of RPM Records 303A/B, released in 1950. Co-composer "Taub", as we know from further above and past parts of this article, is Jules or Joe Bihari. Even BMI has no clue who "Morris" might be. BMI shows their full name as "Morris" only, with no credits given for any other songs. "Jones", of course, is Luke Jones.
Above Left: Label image for Atlas Records AT-162, released in 1946. Atlas was located in Hollywood, CA. Note the "LJ-122" (Luke Jones) numbering on the label. Credited composer Robert Scherman was the owner of Atlas Records.

Above Right: Photo of Joe Alexander circa 1947. He was a baritone singer, drummer, composer, and band leader. Joe was featured with the Floyd Ray Orchestra from 1937 to 1944. During that time, he recorded with Floyd Ray for the Decca label.

In 1945 and 1946, Alexander led his own quintet at a Los Angeles night club. From 1947 to 1948, Alexander sang on six releases for the Capitol/Capitol Americana labels, several of these sides with vocal group backing.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Mama Oh Mama" - Luke Jones And Orchestra (Vocal By Red Mack) - RPM 303A - 1950.
2. "Rompin' The Boogie" - Luke Jones And Orchestra (Vocal By The Band) - RPM 303B - 1950.
3. "Shufflin' Boogie" - Luke Jones With Joe Alexander's Highlanders - Atlas AT-162 - 1946.

ALL THREE SONGS played in sequence.

Above Left: SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY SUN, June 14, 1949.
(NOTE: Red Mack is vocalist on "Mama Oh Mama" featured above.)

Above Right: VICTOR PRESS (Victorville, CA), June 24, 1949.

CALIFORNIA EAGLE, January 8, 1948:
....Luke Jones, tenor saxman, back with Red Mack's outfit for an engagement at El Presidio in Uplands....

CALIFORNIA EAGLE, August 5, 1948:
....Red Mack and his trio appearing at the Club Congo ....

CALIFORNIA EAGLE, December 2, 1948:
....The Bill Jackson Trio (Bill Jackson, drums; Dorothy Broil, piano; Luke Jones, clarinet) to "Bob's Place", Culver City....


ROSCOE GORDON:

ROSCOE GORDON was a singer, pianist, songwriter, and orchestra leader. He grew up in Memphis, TN, moved to Chicago in 1946, and returned to Memphis in 1949. His early recordings were produced by Sam Phillips at the Memphis Recording Service, later to become Sun Records. Roscoe had eleven records released on the RPM label from 1951 to 1953.

Above: Photos of Roscoe Gordon (WDIA, Memphis). Inscription on the left photo: "Musically Yours Roscoe Gordon"
Above Left: Roscoe Gordon with Sam Phillips. Roscoe's first recordings were made in 1951 by Sam Phillips in what was to become the Sun Records' studio. These were sold to Modern Records and Chess Records. RPM 344 "Booted" and "Cold, Cold Winter" are two of these recordings. Phillips did record and release some Roscoe Gordon sides on his Sun label in the mid-to-late 1950s. This is probably when the above photo was taken.

Note the Rooster perched on Roscoe's shoulder. Sun Records' 78-rpm record labels feature a rooster.

Above Right: Label image for RPM Records 344, released in 1951.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"Cold, Cold Winter " - Roscoe Gordon And His Orchestra - RPM 344 - 1951.

Above: Label images for both sides of RPM Records 373, released in 1952.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Lucile (Looking For My Baby)" - Roscoe Gordon And His Orchestra - RPM 373 - 1952.
2. "Blues For My Baby" - Roscoe Gordon And His Orchestra - RPM 373 - 1952.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Cash Box Review (11-15-52):

ROSCOE GORDON — RPM 383
Lucile (B+)
Gordon goes all out as as he delivers a driving vocal of a moderate jump. Lyrics tell of the woes of being in love with "Lucille".
Blues For My Baby (B+) A slow blues presents Gordon at his best. This one could also happen.
(NOTE: A rating of B+ was considered as "excellent".)

EXTRA RECORD — ROSCOE GORDON:
Above Left: Label images for both sides of Duke Records R-109-A/B, recorded on July 21, 1952 and released in 1952. Here is another case that the sides were recorded by Sam Phillips in Memphis and sold by him. Note that "Roscoe" is shown as "Rosco" on the labels.

Composer "James" is David J. Mattis, owner of Duke Records, of which the accuracy seems somewhat suspicious here. BMI credits Mattis and Don D. Robey, owner of Peacock Records, as the composers of "Too Many Women". The plot thickens. It was in July 1952 that Peacock took over Duke Records.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Too Many Women" - Rosco Gordon - Duke R-109-A - 1952.
2. "Wise To You Baby" - Rosco Gordon - Duke R-109-B - 1952.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


The Billboard Review (11-29-52):

ROSCO GORDON — DUKE R-109
Too Many Women (80)
A familiar blues riff is handed a strong vocal by Gordon over a mighty powerful beat by the Beale Streeters. Waxing builds all the way and looks like a potent entry for the boxes, one that should grab loot.
Wise To You Baby (75) Gordon comes thru with another good vocal on this story blues while the ork plays quietly behind him. Side looks headed for some spins.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good" and 80-89 as "excellent".)

At Right: MACON NEWS (Macon, GA), March 22, 1953.

THE BILLBOARD, December 15, 1951: CHESS - BIHARI FEUD RENEWED
CHICAGO—The running feud between the Chess brothers of Chess-Aristocrat diskery here and the Bihari brothers, of Modern-RPM-Intro [sic] diskeries, Hollywood, has flared anew. Original rift between the diskery brothers started about three months ago, when both were battling over who owned the contract to Jackie ("Rocket 88") Brenston.

(NOTE: "Intro" was actually an Aladdin Records' subsidiary label located in Los Angeles.)

Current hassle involves two artists, Johnny Lee Hooker and Roscoe Gordon. Phil Chess told The Billboard that Gordon who has a pressing of "Booted" out on both Chess and Modern. is a contracted artist of Chess Records. The Chess exclusive to Gordon was okayed by the American Federation of Musicians about two months ago, and Gordon cut his disking for Chess about a week after the contract was okayed in Memphis.

In the case of Hooker, both Modern and Chess have versions out on "Louise," backed by "Ground Hog Blues". Chess said that the musicians' union investigated the release of the Chess recording of the two tunes and that the Chess brothers notified the union that they purchased the controversial Hooker masters from Joe Battle, owner of Joe's Record Shop, Detroit, a year ago.

(NOTE: Between 1948 and 1956, John Lee Hooker had twenty-nine releases on the Modern label.)

Union long has had a ruling that an artist cannot recut the same tune unless a five-year period exists between the first and second cutting. Union has made exception to this several times, where an artist has received the okay of the firm for which he first cut the tune.

(NOTE: In the case of Roscoe Gordon, Sam Phillips recorded "Booted" in his Memphis studio in two separate takes, one for Chess Records and the other for Modern Records.)

THE BILLBOARD, December 15, 1951:
....Chess has inked Roscoe Gordon, formerly with Modern....

THE BILLBOARD, February 23, 1952:
....Modern Records settled its differences with Chess Records of Chicago (The Billboard, February 16). The Biharis turned over exclusive pact to Howling Wolf to the Chess Fraters, while Chess brothers gave four Roscoe Gordon masters to Modern....

(NOTE: Modern and Chess both belonged to the record manufacturing "fraternity", thus the term "Fraters".)





THE BILLBOARD, June 28, 1952: BIHARI'S, DUKE IN GORDON TIFF
HOLLYWOOD—The Bihari brothers, owners of Modern, RPM, and Rhythm And Blues Records, this week sought an injunction against Tri-State Recording Company, who has issued records for the past three months on the Duke label, to restrain the Memphis firm from releasing any further masters by Roscoe Gordon.

The Bihari's claim that they have an exclusive AFM pact with Gordon and a separate exclusive vocalist disking pact with the Tennessee singer, who has had a number of hits on RPM.

Jules Bihari told The Billboard that Tri-State has issued disks by Gordon, with the label crediting "Rosco Gordon". The latest Duke release, they allege, is a copy of Roscoe Gordon's current release on RPM, "New Orleans Woman".

Gordon was the object of a previous hassle, in which both Chess Records of Chicago and RPM were releasing Gordon masters. Argument was settled amicably when Chess and RPM traded artists' masters and exclusive pacts.

(NOTE: It seems that "New Orleans Woman" was NOT one of Sam Phillips' masters.)

THE BILLBOARD, July 19, 1952: MODERN INJUNCTION NOT SO—TRI-STATE
NEW YORK—Tri-State Recording, which produces disks under the Duke label, informed The Billboard this week, in relation to its hassle with the Bihari Brothers, that Modern Records has not sought an injunction against their firm. David Mattis, head of Duke Records, stated that the contract between Rosco Gordon and the diskery had been approved by the American Federation of Musicians.

In addition, the firm pointed out that the AFM had sent a letter to Modern explaining that Duke's contract with Rosco Gordon was approved and as "far as the Federation is concerned, he is under contract to the Duke Records company". Mattis said that the disk, "New Orleans Woman", was an original on the Duke label, which "was later recorded and released (by Modern Records) before the Duke version".



Above Left: CASH BOX, November 22, 1952.
(NOTE: The "New Johnny Ace Disk" would seem to be his second for the label, "Cross My Heart"/"Angel", released in January 1953. In that case, Duke R-109 would have come out before Duke R-107. "Terrific" was a well deserved assessment.)

Above Right: CASH BOX AWARD O' THE WEEK, November 29, 1952.
(NOTE: Notice how Roscoe Gordon's records were getting great reviews, along with "B+" [excellent], and "80" [excellent] scores.)


LIGHTNING HOPKINS:

LIGHTNING HOPKINS, from Texas, was a singer, guitarist, and composer. He first recorded for Aladdin Records in 1946. On the Modern Records label, he had three records released in 1947-1948. For RPM, there were seven more records in 1951-1953.

Above: Photo of Lightning Hopkins.
Above Left: Label image for RPM Records 346, released in 1951.

Above Right: Photo of Lightning Hopkins.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
"Lonesome Dog Blues" - Lightning Hopkins - RPM 346 - 1951.

Above Left And Middle: Label images for both sides of Modern Records 20-529A/B, released in 1947. "Big Mama Jump" is mostly an instrumental.

Above Right: Label image for Aladdin 166 B, recorded on November 9, 1946 and released in 1947.

At the beginning of "Big Mama Jump", Hopkins says "This ain't the Little Mama Boogie, but it's the same as". However, that didn't stop Hopkins from taking composer credit for it.

Wilson "Thunder" Smith plays the piano and does the vocal on "Little Mama Boogie", while Lightning Hopkins plays the guitar on it. BMI gives "Wilson Smith" sole composer credit for the song. Interesting combination, "Thunder" and "Lightning".

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Short Haired Woman" - Sam "Lightning" Hopkins - Modern 20-529A - 1947.
2. "Big Mama Jump" - Sam "Lightning" Hopkins - Modern 20-529B - 1947.
3. "Little Mama Boogie" - "Thunder" Smith - Aladdin 166 B - 1947.

ALL THREE SONGS played in sequence.


EXTRA RECORD—LIGHTNING HOPKINS":
Above Left: Label image for Aladdin Records 3063A, released in 1948.

Above Right: Photo of Lightning Hopkins.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Shotgun Blues" - Lightning Hopkins - Aladdin 3063A - 1948..
2. "Rollin' Blues" - Lightning Hopkins - Aladdin 3063B - 1948..

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above: Photo of Lightning Hopkins.

JOE HOUSTON:

JOE HOUSTON, from Texas, was a singer, saxophone player, and orchestra leader. He was known as the "Wild Man of the Tenor Sax". Joe moved to Los Angeles in the early 1950s. He had five records on the Modern label (1951-1953) and three on the RPM label (1955).

Above: Two photos of Joe Houston.
Above Left: Label image for RPM Records 426, released in 1955.

Above Right: Label image for Modern Records 830, released in 1951.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Shtiggy Boom" - "The Fabulous" Joe Houston (With Vocal Group) - RPM 426 - 1955.
1. "Come Back Baby " - Joe Houston - Modern 830 - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

At Right: Photo of Joe Houston.

CASH BOX, January 22, 1955:
....The Bihari Brothers are making plenty of news these days. They recently signed Joe Houston and quickly rushed him and his band into the Modern studios to cut several new sides....

The Billboard Review (2-26-55):

JOE HOUSTON — RPM 426
Shtiggy Boom (80)
Swingy new rocker that has all the West Cast record firms excited is handed a driving reading by the Houston ork with the sidemen on the vocal. Houston turns in some solid work on sax, and the side builds all the way. This could happen.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 80-89 considered as "excellent".)

Cash Box Review (3-5-55):

JOE HOUSTON — RPM 426
Shtiggy Boom (B)
Another version of what promises to be a big r&b and pop tune is given a wild reading by that wild man of the horn and a hard hitting ork. Lyrics are subordinated on this treatment.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)

EXTRA RECORDS—JOE HOUSTON:
Above Left: Label image for Freedom Records F-1526, released in 1950.

Above Right: Label image for Imperial Records 5183, released in 1949.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "It's Really Wee Wee Hours" - Joe Houston Trio And Orchestra (Vocal By Trio) - Freedom F-1526 - 1950.
2. "Jump The Blues" - Joe Houston - Imperial 5183 - 1949.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Above: Label images for both sides of Mercury 8248, released in 1951.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Worry, Worry, Worry" - Joe Houston (Vocal By The Band) - Mercury 8248 - 1951.
2. "Hard Time Baby (Instrumental)" - Joe Houston - Mercury 8248 - 1951.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.


NEWSPAPERS—JOE HOUSTON:
Above Left: CALIFORNIA EAGLE, September 15, 1955: JOE "SAX" HOUSTON
....Joe Houston is the "wild man of the tenor sax". His antics with his horn are recognized all over the Coast. He can probably blow a sax in more positions than any other man alive. Aside from his showmanship, however, Joe is a fine musician. Ask any of the boys in the know....

Above Middle: MIRROR NEWS (Los Angeles, CA), November 5, 1955:
JOE HOUSTON, billed as "the wild man of the tenor sax", is in the Rock 'n' Roll Show now on the stage of the Paramount Downtown Theater.

Above Right: VENTURA COUNTY STAR FREE PRESS, November 13, 1954: "SAX" BATTLE
JOE HOUSTON will battle it out with Big "J" McNeely at the Green Mill Ballroom in Ventura tonight....

Above Left: CALIFORNIA EAGLE, November 25, 1954.

Above Right: VENTURA COUNTY STAR FREE PRESS, December 9, 1955.


OAKLAND TRIBUNE, September 4, 1955: JOE HOUSTON AND HIS SAX COME TO OAKLAND
Joe Houston, the tenor sax player whose orchestra will accompany the rhythm and blues group, The Drifters, in a dance tomorrow night at Sweet's Ballroom, studied classical music for three years at Wilberforce University and Julliard in New York before launching his career as a bandleader.

Houston, who won a scholarship to Wilberforce when he was only 17, had originally intended to be a clarinetist but displayed such aptitude for the tenor saxophone that he decided to devote his time to it.

With his orchestra he has recorded many hit tunes in recent years including "Blow Joe Blow", "Way Out", and "All Night Long".

Above Left: SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY SUN, November 12, 1954.

Above Middle: Photo of Big Jay McNeely.

Above Right: Label image for Exclusive 96x, released in 1949.

Compare Joe Houston with the following side by Big Jay McNeely.
Who would you have picked to win the battle?

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): "Road House Boogie" - Big Jay McNeely - Exclusive 96x - 1949.


EXTRA RECORD—SHTIGGY BOOM - PATTI ANNE:

Shtiggy Boom was composed by singer/songwriter/harmonica wizard Leo Diamond and Los Angeles area disc jockey, and sometimes master of ceremonies, Al Jarvis.

There were several versions of "Shtiggy Boom" released in 1955 other than Joe Houston's. These include Patti Anne (Aladdin), The Bill Johnson Quartet (Ronnex), The Nuggets (a five member Black group, Capitol), Leo Diamond (RCA Victor), and The Dooley Sisters (Tampa).

Above: Two photos of Patti Anne, (Left) JET MAGAZINE, January 1954 and (Right) JET MAGAZINE, June 1955.

JET MAGAZINE, January 1954:
Backed by her wealthy white father and her blonde Negro-mother, Patty Ann Mesner, a pretty, gingerbread-brown Los Angeles girl made her debut in the enter­tainment field, scoring heavily with critics—who promptly dubbed her a "Silver Spoon Singer".

The adopted daughter of [Aladdin] recording company president Eddie Mesner, Patty began her career at the top of the trade with enviable recording and booking con­nections which landed her engagements with Louis Jordan and Duke Ellington.

Patty's riches-to-riches career began last August when Mesner heard her singing at their home in the ultra-swank Pacific Palisades section of Los An­geles. Mesner, who adopted Patty soon after he mar­ried her mother, Reese, in 1945, immediately rushed her to his studio and recorded two ballads.

Louis Jordan heard the records and used her as a singer with his band on several dates. Club and theater engagements followed in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Chicago where she appeared on pro­grams with Duke Ellington at the Regal Theater.

A quiet-spoken entertainer who paints during her spare time, Patty—whose real name is Patricia Mes­ner—has a fresh, inviting style. She is an avid John­ny Ray fan and her gestures and facial movements are in the wind-mill-like Johnny Ray style.

Critics predict a brilliant career for Patty, who graduated from Los Angeles' Dorsey High School in 1949.

JET MAGAZINE, June 1955:
The new singer with Lionel Hampton's band is cute Patty Ann Mesner, whose father owns Aladdin Records. Her mother, Reese, travels with Patty Ann to discourage the stage door Johnnies.


Above: Label image for Aladdin 3280, recorded on January 29, 1955 and released in February of that year.
(Label image and audio provided by Andrew Bohan.)

Patti Anne is backed by an uncredited vocal group on this side. She had two previous releases on Aladdin (1952-53) under the name "Patty Anne" and backed by The Hollywood Flames.

Trade Magazine, February 1955:
....Favorite expression around Aladdin offices these days is "Shtiggy Boom". Both Leo and Eddie Mesner are firmly convinced that their version of the tune with Patti Anne will soon hit the top....

LISTEN (Windows Media Player): "Shtiggy Boom" - Patti Anne (With Vocal Group) - Aladdin 3280 - 1955.


CASH BOX REVIEW — FEBRUARY 26, 1955


DONNA HIGHTOWER:

DONNA HIGHTOWER was a singer and song writer. She began her recording career in 1951 at a major label, Decca Records, under the name "Little Donna Hightower". In 1958 she was signed to another major, Capitol Records. For RPM Records, Donna had four records released from 1955 to 1956.

Above: Photo of Donna Hightower.

Above Left And Middle: Label images for both sides of RPM Records 432, released in June 1955. Donna is backed vocally by The Jacks, who are covered in Part Five of this article. BMI credits Donna Vanoutrive Hightower as sole composer for both songs.
(Audio for this record provided by Andrew Bohan.)

Above Right: Photo of Donna Hightower.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Dog Gone It" - Donna Hightower (With The Jacks) - RPM 432 - 1955.
2. "Love Me Again" - Donna Hightower (With The Jacks) - RPM 432 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

CASH BOX, June 25, 1955:
....Saul Bihari, head of Modern Records, announced that they have signed a sensational new female warbler by the name of Donna Hightower. Her first release, out this week is, "Dog Gone It, You Did It" b/w "Love Me Again". Miss Hightower says that talented vocal chords just seem to run in her family. Her sister is Laverne Baker....

(NOTE: No evidence was found confirming the assertion that Laverne Baker was Donna's sister. It seems that Donna might have been kidding around with that statement, if she made it at all.)

CASH BOX, July 9, 1955:
....Saul Bihari of Modern Records reports regional nibbles on Donna Hightower's "Dog Gone It"....

The Billboard Review (7-2-55):

DONNA HIGHTOWER — RPM 432
Love Me Again (72)
The thrush seems more at home with this ballad of her own cleffing.
Dog Gone It (70) With an arrangement patterned after the recent Lavern Baker hits, Miss H. turns in a fairly effective tho mechanical shout.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

Cash Box Review (7-16-55):

DONNA HIGHTOWER — RPM 432
Dog Gone It ((B)
Hightower shows that sister Lavern Baker is not the only one in the family with talent. Donna, with a mediocre piece of material, comes off well. Group support helps the disk. Better than average wax.
Love Me Again (B) Donna has a better tune to work with here and the result is a happy lightweight bouncer. Ok for both r&b and pop markets.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered "very good".)
Above Left: Label image for RPM Records 439, released in September 1955. Again, The Jacks are the vocal group backing Donna on this record, but only slightly on the "Since You" side. The credited co-composer "Davis" is Maxwell Davis.

Above Right: Photo of Donna Hightower when with Capitol Records, circa 1958.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Bob-O-Link" - Donna Hightower (With The Jacks) - RPM 439 - 1955.
2. "Since You" - Donna Hightower (With The Jacks) - RPM 439 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Cash Box Review (10-1-55):

DONNA HIGHTOWER — RPM 439
Bob-O-Link (B+)
Donna Hightower delivers a cute bouncing ditty that conveys the high spirits of the thrush. Happy effort that could make it in both fields.
Since You (B) Simple romantic bouncer delivered without flourishes. Ok side that does not come up to the charm of the "Bob-O-Link" side.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good" and B+ as "excellent".)

CASH BOX, October 15, 1955:
....Donna Hightower currently doing great business on her Southern tour, and also doing all right on record with her "Bob-O-Link"....

CASH BOX, December 17, 1955:
....Modern Record's Donna Hightower is the current attraction at the Apollo, and, after closing there, tours the East Coast down to Miami....

CASH BOX, February 2, 1957:
....Donna Hightower, currently appearing in San Antonio, returns next week to visit the jockeys and promote her latest release on the RPM label....


EXTRA RECORDS—DON'T YOU THINK I OUGHTA KNOW":

This song was composed by William Johnson and Mel Wettergreen. William "Bill" Johnson first issued it with his Musical Notes on RCA Victor in 1947. Other versions that followed in 1947 include those by the Hadda Brooks Trio (Modern), Buddy Greco And The Three Sharps (Musicraft), and Ella Fitzgerald (Decca).

Above Left: Label image for Decca 28233, released in 1952.

Above Right: Label image for RCA Victor 20-2225, released in March 1947.

Cash Box Review (6-14-52):

LITTLE DONNA HIGHTOWER — Decca 28233
Don't You Think I Ought To Know (B)
This side is a rhythmic number that Little Donna socks out expressively for a strong end.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)
Above: ST. PAUL RECORDER, August 28, 1953.

STAR TRIBUNE (Minneapolis, MN, August 28, 1953:
....LITTLE DONNA Hightower, bop singer, is back shouting at the Key Club. She likes it so much, in fact, she bought a house in Minneapolis and decided to stay. She's booked indefinitely....

Above: ST. PAUL RECORDER, August 7, 1953.

[The above picture provided by Gus Gordon.]
Above: Bill Johnson And His Musical Notes, (TOP L-R) Gus Gordon (tenor, drums); Jimmy Robinson (baritone/bass, bass fiddle); Bill Johnson (tenor, alto sax/clarinet); Clifton "Skeeter" Best (tenor, guitar); and (BOTTOM) Egbert Victory (baritone, piano).

Click HERE for an article about BILL JOHNSON AND THE MUSICAL NOTES by Marv Goldberg.
(Will open in a separate window)


(CASH BOX - 9-22-47).

NOTE: HADDA BROOKS has been covered
extensively in Parts One and Three of this article.









Above Left: Label image for Modern 155 B, released in 1947. The clipping at direct left shows the original "Oughta" title of the song as used by Bill Johnson And His Musical Notes.

Above Right: Label image for Jubilee 5122, released in 1953.



[The above photo courtesy of Paul Ressler.]
Above: The Orioles, (TOP) Alexander Sharp, (BOTTOM L-R) Sonny Til, George Nelson, Ralph Williams, and Johnny Reed.

Click HERE for an article about THE ORIOLES by Marv Goldberg.
(Will open in a separate window)

EUREKA HUMBOLDT STANDARD (Eureka, CA), July 4, 1959: LENZI'S SUPPER CLUB

(The following is taken from an ad for Lenzi's Supper Club, including the picture at right)

Now Playing - HADDA BROOKS and Her Piano - Recording Artist of Stage, Screen, and TV.

Hadda Brooks, born in Los Angeles in the shadow of a movie studio, is a music major, having graduated from the University of Southern California. She plays piano and organ, and since 1946 she has sung to her own accompaniment.

Miss Brooks, possessor of a sexy yet husky voice is known to millions of record buyers, having recorded for Modern Records, Okeh, Mercury, London, and Columbia. Presently she is under contract to Modern Records, where she is currently enjoying a hit record via Jerome Kern's immortal "Old Man River". This is the most successful recording to date of "River" done by a female vocalist. In Paris she appeared at the Lido Club and other appearances in Italy, Germany, and other sectors of Europe.

For the past three seasons she has worked in Bermuda. She also toured for Abe Saperstein and his Harlem Globetrotter Revue on two world-wide tours.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Don't You Think I Ought To Know" - Little Donna Hightower - Decca 28233 - 1952.
2. "Don't You Think I Oughta Know" - Bill Johnson And His Musical Notes - RCA Victor 20-2225 - 1947.
3. "Don't You Think I Ought To Know" - Hadda Brooks Trio - Modern 155 B - 1947.
4. "Don't You Think I Ought To Know" - The Orioles - Jubilee 5122 - 1953.

ALL FOUR SONGS played in sequence.


ARTHUR LEE MAYE AND THE CROWNS:

ARTHUR LEE MAYE was a singer and major league baseball player. Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns had releases on Flair (1954-55), Modern (1954), RPM (1955), Specialty (1956), Dig (1956), Flip (1957), and Cash (1958).

Click HERE for an article about ARTHUR LEE MAYE AND THE CROWNS by Marv Goldberg.
(Will open in a separate window)

Above: Photo of Arthur Lee Maye.
Above: Label image for both sides of RPM Records 424, released in February 1955. Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns on RPM 424 and 429 (below) are Arthur Lee Maye (tenor); Charles Colbert (tenor); Joe Moore (baritone); Richard Berry (baritone); and Johnny Coleman (bass). The Crowns were named after Modern Records' subsidiary label, Crown Records.

Richard Berry has composer credit on "Truly" as does Johnny Otis on the flip side.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Truly" - Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns - RPM 424 - 1955.
2. "Oochie Pachie" - Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns - RPM 424 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

The Billboard Review (2-19-55):

ARTHUR LEE MAYE — RPM 424
Oochie Pachie (74)
The singer has a swingy piece of material here with suggestive lyrics that may not appeal to some deejays, but ought to grab coin for operators. Backing by The Crowns is very effective.
Truly (73) This ballad, stylishly vocalized by Maye to the tasteful harmonizing of The Crowns, will be more acceptable for radio programming, and also sets a high standard of performance.
(NOTE: Ratings had a range of 0-100 with 70-79 considered as "good".)

At Left: Arthur Lee Maye in baseball uniform and hitting stance.

Above: RPM Records "Truly" clipping from May 1955.


CASH BOX, November 6, 1954:
....Arthur Lee Maye, new blues chanter, bows in on the Modern label this week. The chanter is also a 17-year-old bonus baseball player for the Milwaukee Braves. His first release is "I Wanna' Love" and "Set My Heart Free"....

EVANSVILLE COURIER, May 29, 1956:
Arthur Lee Maye, Evansville center fielder, had a big night at Bosse Field. He drove in four runs with two hits, one a three-run home run over the wire fence in right center. This was the seventh home run for the 21-year-old Los Angeles Negro in the young Three_I League season. He is tied for the league lead in homers.

Above: Label image for both sides of RPM Records 429, released in May 1955. Per BMI, composer credits for both sides go to Richard Berry, Maxwell Davis, and both Jules and Joe Bihari. No credit given to Arthur Lee Maye.

LISTEN (Windows Media Player):
1. "Love Me Always" - Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns - RPM 429 - 1955.
2. "Loop, De Loop, De Loop " - Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns - RPM 429 - 1955.

BOTH SONGS played in sequence.

Cash Box Review (6-4-55):

ARTHUR LEE MAYE — Modern 429
Loop, De Loop, De Loop (B)
Arthur Lee Maye gravel voices a middle beat jump and lends it a fair degree of excitement. The Crowns assist. Fair side.

Love Me Always (B) Maye rocks a gentle melodic sway that comes off the better wax.
(NOTE: A rating of B was considered as "very good".)


"MODERN RECORDS - PART SEVEN" WILL FINISH RPM RECORDS AND THEN DELVE INTO THEIR SUBSIDIARY LABEL, FLAIR RECORDS.

MODERN RECORDS - PART ONE FEATURES HADDA BROOKS, PEARL TRAYLER, THE THREE BITS OF RHYTHM, GENE PHILLIPS, LITTLE WILLIE JACKSON, THE COMMANDERS, THE SCAMPS, AND THE SONGS "ROMANCE IN THE DARK", "I'LL BE TRUE", "LONESOME ROAD", AND "I'M FALLING FOR YOU".

MODERN RECORDS - PART TWO FEATURES LILLIE GREENWOOD, LITTLE WILLIE LITTLEFIELD, PEE WEE CRAYTON, LITTLE ESTHER, SMOKEY HOG, GEORGE BLEDSOE AND THE MOON MISTS, THE SMITH JUBILEE SINGERS, AND MODERN RECORDS' COLONIAL LABEL.

MODERN RECORDS - PART THREE FEATURES HADDA BROOKS, THE EBONAIRES, JIMMY WITHERSPOON, HELEN HUMES, THE SONGS "BEWILDERED", "BE-BABA-LEBA", AND "THEY RAIDED THE JOINT", PLUS MISCELLANEOUS MODERN RECORDS' BLUES ARTISTS (ROY HAWKINS, CHARLEY BOOKER, ROBERT BLAND, MARY SUE).

MODERN RECORDS - PART FOUR FEATURES JOHNNY MOORE'S THREE BLAZERS, MARI JONES, FRANKIE ERVIN, OSCAR McLOLLIE, YOUNG JESSIE, JIMMY McCRACKLIN, JOHN LEE HOOKER, AND THE FOUR OF US. ALSO, THE SONGS "DRIFTING BLUES", "MY SONG", "C.O.D.", AND "I SMELL A RAT".

MODERN RECORDS - PART FIVE FEATURES JESSE BELVIN, THE CLIQUES, JIMMY BEASLEY, THE CADETS/JACKS, DOLLY COOPER, ETTA JAMES, THE COBRAS, FRED DARIAN AND THE DREAMERS, JIMMIE LEE AND ARTIS, THE SOUNDS, AND THE ROCKETS. ALSO, THE SONGS "NEAR YOU", "ROLLIN' STONE", "SIXTY MINUTE MAN", "I GOT LOADED", "STRANDED IN THE JUNGLE", "THE HENRY SONGS", AND "SINDY (CINDY)".


Listen to all of this article's audio selections using Windows Media Player:

          1. "Hard Workin' Woman" - B.B. King (Vocal Backing By The Band) - RPM 330 - 1951.
          2. "She's A Mean Woman" - B.B. King - RPM 330 - 1951.
          3. "Blind Love" - B.B. King And His Orchestra - RPM 395 - 1953.
          4. "Why Did You Leave Me" - B.B. King And His Orchestra - RPM 395 - 1953.
          5. "Bim Bam" - B.B. King And His Orchestra (With Vocal Group) - RPM 479 - 1956.
          6. "On My Word Of Honor" - B.B. King And His Orchestra (With Vocal Group) - RPM 479 - 1956.
          7. "Found Me A Sugar Daddy" - The Nic Nacs (With Mickey Champion) - RPM 342 - 1951.
          8. "Gonna Have A Merry Christmas" - The Nic Nacs (With Mickey Champion) - RPM 342 - 1951.
          9. "You Didn't Want My Love" - The Nic Nacs - RPM 316 - 1951.
        10. "Riot In Cell Block #9" - The Robins - Spark 103 - 1954.
        11. "I Made A Vow" - The Robins - Crown 106 - 1954.
        12. "Double Crossin Baby" - The Robins - Crown 106 - 1954.
        13. "Mama Oh Mama" - Luke Jones And Orchestra (Vocal By Red Mack) - RPM 303A - 1950.
        14. "Rompin' The Boogie" - Luke Jones And Orchestra (Vocal By The Band) - RPM 303B - 1950.
        15. "Shufflin' Boogie" - Luke Jones With Joe Alexander's Highlanders - Atlas AT-162 - 1946.
        16. "Cold, Cold Winter " - Roscoe Gordon And His Orchestra - RPM 344 - 1951.
        17. "Lucile (Looking For My Baby)" - Roscoe Gordon And His Orchestra - RPM 373 - 1952.
        18. "Blues For My Baby" - Roscoe Gordon And His Orchestra - RPM 373 - 1952.
        19. "Too Many Women" - Rosco Gordon - Duke R-109-A - 1952.
        20. "Wise To You Baby" - Rosco Gordon - Duke R-109-B - 1952.
        21. "Lonesome Dog Blues" - Lightning Hopkins - RPM 346 - 1951.
        22. "Short Haired Woman" - Sam "Lightning" Hopkins - Modern 20-529A - 1947.
        23. "Big Mama Jump" - Sam "Lightning" Hopkins - Modern 20-529B - 1947.
        24. "Little Mama Boogie" - "Thunder" Smith - Aladdin 166 B - 1947.
        25. "Shotgun Blues" - Lightning Hopkins - Aladdin 3063A - 1948.
        26. "Rollin' Blues" - Lightning Hopkins - Aladdin 3063B - 1948.
        27. "Shtiggy Boom" - "The Fabulous" Joe Houston (With Vocal Group) - RPM 426 - 1955.
        28. "Come Back Baby " - Joe Houston - Modern 830 - 1951.
        29. "It's Really Wee Wee Hours" - Joe Houston Trio And Orchestra (Vocal By Trio) - Freedom F-1526 - 1950.
        30. "Jump The Blues" - Joe Houston - Imperial 5183 - 1949.
        31. "Worry, Worry, Worry" - Joe Houston (Vocal By The Band) - Mercury 8248 - 1951.
        32. "Hard Time Baby (Instrumental)" - Joe Houston - Mercury 8248 - 1951.
        33. "Road House Boogie" - Big Jay McNeely - Exclusive 96x - 1949.
        34. "Shtiggy Boom" - Patti Anne (With Vocal Group) - Aladdin 3280 - 1955.
        35. "Dog Gone It" - Donna Hightower (With The Jacks) - RPM 432 - 1955.
        36. "Love Me Again" - Donna Hightower (With The Jacks) - RPM 432 - 1955.
        37. "Bob-O-Link" - Donna Hightower (With The Jacks) - RPM 439 - 1955.
        38. "Since You" - Donna Hightower (With The Jacks) - RPM 439 - 1955.
        39. "Don't You Think I Ought To Know" - Little Donna Hightower - Decca 28233 - 1952.
        40. "Don't You Think I Oughta Know" - Bill Johnson And His Musical Notes - RCA Victor 20-2225 - 1947.
        41. "Don't You Think I Ought To Know" - Hadda Brooks Trio - Modern 155 B - 1947.
        42. "Don't You Think I Ought To Know" - The Orioles - Jubilee 5122 - 1953.
        43. "Truly" - Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns - RPM 424 - 1955.
        44. "Oochie Pachie" - Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns - RPM 424 - 1955.
        45. "Love Me Always" - Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns - RPM 429 - 1955.
        46. "Loop, De Loop, De Loop " - Arthur Lee Maye And The Crowns - RPM 429 - 1955.
 
          ALL FORTY-SIX ABOVE SONGS played in sequence.

          ALL THIRTY ABOVE MODERN/RPM LABEL SONGS played in sequence.


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